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A wonderful video of Elder Paisios giving spiritual counsel. English subtitles are provided.

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(Source) The Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God was painted by the Evangelist Luke on a board from the table at which the Savior ate together with His All-Pure Mother and Righteous Joseph. The Mother of God, upon seeing this image, exclaimed, “Henceforth, all generations shall call Me blessed. The grace of both My Son and Me shall be with this icon.”

In the year 1131, the icon was sent from Constantinople to Rus to holy Prince Mstislav (April 15) and was installed in the Devichi monastery in Vyshgorod, the ancient appanage city of the holy Equal of the Apostles Princess Olga.

The son of George Dolgoruky, St Andrew Bogoliubsky, brought the icon to the city of Vladimir in 1155 and installed it in the renowned Dormition cathedral which he built. At this time the icon received its name of “the Vladimir Icon.” The icon was first brought to Moscow in the year 1395. Thus, the blessing of the Mother of God established the spiritual bonds of Byzantium and Rus via Kiev, Vladimir and Moscow…

Read more about this feast here.

Visit Newfoundland’s Holy Lady of Vladimir Mission’s website here.

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The Martyr Lupus lived at the end of the third century and beginning of the fourth century, and was a faithful servant of the holy Great Martyr Demetrius of Thessalonica (October 26). Being present at the death of his master, he soaked his own clothing with his blood and took a ring from his hand. With this clothing, and with the ring and the name of the Great Martyr Demetrius, St Lupus worked many miracles at Thessalonica. He destroyed pagan idols, for which he was subjected to persecution by the pagans, but he was preserved unharmed by the power of God.

St Lupus voluntarily delivered himself into the hands of the torturers, and by order of the emperor Maximian Galerius, he was beheaded by the sword.

(Source)

The Lanier Library Lecture Series – Saint Catherine’s Monastery – An Ark in the Wilderness – Father Justin – recorded 11-06-10

Subjects include Codex Sinaiticus, manuscripts of Mt Sinai and Greek Orthodoxy.

Saint Catherine’s Monastery is the world’s oldest continuously inhabited monastery, with a history extending back over 1700 years. In the mid-nineteenth century, it was at this monastery that what became known as codex Sinaiticus was discovered. It is the only known complete copy of the Greek New Testament in uncial script. Although this codex is now kept in the British Museum, St. Catherine’s library contains manuscripts famous throughout the world for their antiquity and for the range of languages that appear in the collection. Father Justin will show five manuscripts in particular that have been studied by scholars within the last year, as a way of demonstrating the continuing significance of the Sinai manuscripts for our understanding of the Scriptures and of the heritage of the Church.

Father Justin was born in Ft Worth, Texas, in 1949. He lived in Chile until the age of nine, after which his family moved to El Paso. After graduating from the University of Texas at Austin in 1971, he entered a Greek Orthodox monastery three years later. He was tonsured a monk in 1977, and ordained deacon and priest the following year. He has been a member of Saint Catherine’s Monastery since 1996, where his responsibilities have included the photography of the Sinai manuscripts with a high-resolution digital camera. Five years ago, the members of the community elected him librarian.

The Lanier Theological Library is an exciting new resource for all students and scholars of the Bible. The LTL is a research library and is open to everyone who will use it responsibly. Within the library, you will find a comprehensive collection of books, periodicals, historical documents and artifacts with topics ranging from Church History and Biblical Studies to Egyptology and Linguistics. The LTL regularly hosts events with noted authors, guest lecturers, and researchers who will challenge you both academically and spiritually. Come to the Lanier Theological Library and find serious tools for serious study.

For more info on this: http://www.laniertheologicallibrary.org/

 

“Beyond Torture” – though difficult at times to watch – is a documentary that gives us an all-important glimpse into the sufferings of our Romanian brothers in the awful communist prison camp, the Pitesti gulag. Brace yourself, the content is graphic at times.

O Holy New-martyrs of Romania, pray to God for us!

 

 

scent-of-holinessWhen The Scent of Holiness was first published a few friends jokingly asked, “When’s the sequel coming out?” I would usually just laugh thinking I had expended my supply of interesting stories. But out of curiosity I sat down one day to write down a list of ideas, stories I didn’t record in the first book, stories that hadn’t happened until after The Scent of Holiness was published. I think I came up with 35 stories in that first sitting. Since then the list has more than doubled and I’ve steadily been working away at writing them all down with the intention of publishing them in the future (God willing). The focus of this second book is not relegated to women’s monasteries; it will contain stories of encounters with monks, nuns, elders, and laypeople, experiences in North America, South Korea and Greece. As tomorrow is the feast of the Dormition of the Mother of God, I thought I’d share this rough draft of a story I recently wrote for this second book.

Contemplating the Virtue of the Theotokos

During the winter months the sun had already set by the time I reached the Holy Dormition Monastery of the Mother of God. Vespers was most often held in the large catholicon outside the monastery gates. Entering the outer narthex I would light a beeswax candle in front of the festal icon the sisters had laid out on an icon stand. As soon as I opened the large wooden door to the nave I would be greeted by the sound of the nuns melodic chanting and surrounded by the sweet fragrance of burning incense. I would then proceed to the large icon of the Mother of God, depicted with the Lord on her lap. In those sacred, if fleeting, moments a person could feel genuinely connected to the Mother of God. In the dim light of the church, one could even supplicate the Theotokos with tears and be noticed by no one. As far away as she seemed out in the world at times, that much and more close she seemed in the sacred space of her holy monastery.

To stand in the presence of a holy icon is to stand in the presence of the person depicted therein, and so whether we stand before a large icon encased in an elaborately decorated wooden icon stand or before a paper icon taped on the wall of our bedroom, we stand before the holy person whose countenance is painted in line and colour. But in the peaceful, prayerful atmosphere of a holy monastery, we often become more attuned to the spiritual reality surrounding us, and being more attuned to this spiritual reality not only makes our prayer flow more readily but contemplation of holy mysteries comes within our grasp.

It is in moments such as these that I contemplate the person of the Most Holy Theotokos. Thinking on her life and works, her sufferings and sacrifice, I feel as though she offers us the answer to all our problems. The example of her life is the cure to our illness, the source of joy to heal our sorrow. By means of merely two of her countless virtues – obedience and purity – she teaches us everything. In her obedience to God she shows us that perfect freedom and attaining our “full potential” is found in submitting our fallen and corrupted will to the all-good Father, thus molding our will into His will and therefore being able to (eventually) not only “know the good”, but will it and do it.

With her outward and inward purity she points us to the easy path of sanctification. By keeping our souls and bodies pure, by not even accepting corrupted thoughts, we maintain the ability to hear and communicate with God, and thus know how to live in conformity with His will. If we have long ago lost our purity – whether it be mental, spiritual and/or physical purity – we have the opportunity to restore it through confession and repentance. Confession and repentance are our constant means to imitate her virtue and please her Son and our God, as she does best of all.

And so, no matter how ill we are, no matter our upbringing, no matter the genetic weaknesses we have inherited (of body and soul), no matter the state of the world around us, we have the opportunity by God’s grace, through the prayers of the Theotokos, to become healthy, to become holy. We too can, in our own dormition, pass from life to life through a mere “falling asleep”, if only we would imitate her virtue.dormition-3

Popular authour and podcastor Molly Sabourin reflects on her experience visiting Holy Dormition Orthodox Monastery in Rives Junction, Michigan.

You can listen to the podcast, entitled Salt, here. She asks, “If Christians are to be the salt of the earth, who will be the salt of Christians?”

 

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