Archive for the ‘Translations’ Category

Death and Resurrection[1]

Metropolitan Augoustinos (Kantiotes) of Florina

I hesitate to speak to you, brothers and sisters, for our times are like those described in a certain prophecy wherein it is said that the ears of men will be open to the devil, but not to Christ.[2] For your sakes, however, I will deign to say a few words, knowing that though not everyone will listen to me, perhaps half will; and if not half, perhaps ten; and if not ten, perhaps one. If even one hears me, this is enough! The reward is great! As Christ himself says, one soul is worth more than the whole visible world.[3]

There is one lone word which causes everyone to quake with fear. What word is it? It is the word ‘death’. When people hear the word ‘death’, they become agitated and uneasy. Once when I was a young ierokyrakas (preacher) visiting a village,[4] I uttered the word ‘death’ somewhere in the context of my sermon, and at that very moment I overheard someone in the crowd cry out with terror, “Knock on wood!” They thought that by doing this they might chase death away. Death will come, however; it is a fact of life.

When will it come? It will come at the moment we least expect it. It comes at night – in the middle of the night; it comes in the morning; it comes while one is at work; it may come anytime. The hour when we will give up our soul to God is unknown to us.

What is death? Is it oblivion? Non-believers say that it is oblivion. You die, they say, and that’s it; you are finished, gone! But we say that beyond the grave there exists another life. The body may dissolve into those elements from which it is composed, but the soul is immortal and eternal and lives on until one day the body will resurrect and the immortal soul will return to it. There will be a resurrection!

‘Are there proofs of this?’ the atheists ask. There are, indeed! What are these proofs? There are three kinds of proofs, in fact: first, we have the testimony of nature; second, we have the various prophesies of the Holy Scriptures; and third, we have the relevant miracles of our Lord Jesus Christ.

So there are proofs of the resurrection! Every seed proclaims this to us. What is a seed? It is but the tiniest little thing. You sow it in the earth, it decays, and then from it a little stem grows, eventually peeking out from the earth and sprouting sometimes thirty, sometimes sixty, sometimes one hundred bean sprouts. During the summer months these plants cover entire fields like a green sea – what a beautiful sight! Once a non-believing scientist visited the Holy Mountain, staying at a kelli whose elder loved flowers. As the courtyard was fragrant with the scent of multi-coloured flowers, the elder asked his visitor, “Do you know where all these came from?” “Where?” replied the scientist. “I will show you,” said the elder. Disappearing for a moment, he returned with a box containing seeds. If you have ever seen a seed, you will know that it is often smaller than the head of a pin, and yet within it hides a flower, a plant, or even a great tree. How can this be? Try as it may, science cannot make a seed. The Apostle Paul himself uses this example. “You doubt that there is a resurrection?” the elder continued, “Just look at the seed. Just as a seed falls to the ground, decays, and then grows into a beautiful plant or tree, so man dies and his body decays under the earth so that one day from that decayed body a new, more beautiful body might proceed.”[5] The whole of nature preaches the resurrection: the sun which rises in the morning, the moon which comes out at night, the stars which shine in the heavens; the whole universe proclaims this!

Prophesies, too, announce the resurrection of the dead. We hear one such Old Testament prophesy read on Holy Saturday. What does it say? The Prophet Ezekiel stood over a plain which was full of bones and suddenly heard a voice saying, “Can these bones live?” To this he replied, “Lord, you know.” God then commanded him, “Preach, speak to these bones.” Then the earth began to shake and the bones came back together forming skeletons, and sinews bound them together and skin covered them. They were yet missing souls, however, so lastly God commanded Ezekiel to preach again, and finally all those bodies resurrected.[6] This vision is a prophesy concerning the resurrection of the dead.

But the greatest argument proving that death has been overcome lies in those miracles where Christ raised men from the dead. There are three such miracles that he worked on others: first, he raised Jarius’ daughter; second, he raised the son of the widow of Nain – weeping loudly over the loss of her only child, Christ approached her and said, “Weep not”;[7] and third, he raised his friend Lazarus who was four days in the tomb.[8] Finally, after enduring death on the Cross and three days in the tomb, Christ then resurrected himself.

There is such a thing as the resurrection then! As certain as you are that tomorrow will be Monday, so certain should you be that the dead will rise! Accordingly, death should not be called ‘death’, but rather ‘sleep’. When a mother sees her child sleeping does she weep? No! For she knows that he will wake up energetic and refreshed. And nekrotafia (graveyards) should not be called nekrotafia, but rather koimitiria (sleep-yards).[9] Death is a sleep – this is what the Gospel, the Church, and Saint Kosmas all tell us – and therefore Christians should not weep inconsolably on its account. Just as one who sleeps eventually wakes up, so one day will all the dead be resurrected in order to be judged in accordance with their works, “…and these (those on the left) shall go away into everlasting punishment: but the righteous into life eternal.”[10]

The resurrection of Christ and of every mortal man – the common resurrection – is a fact. And this we confess every time we say the Creed: “And I look for the resection of the dead, and the life of the world to come. Amen.”

This is what I had wanted to say to you. And I preach with the hope that what I have said has not fallen on deaf ears for without having met certain preconditions, it is impossible for one to believe in the resurrection: I hope that none among you is an atheist; everything around you cries out that God – the Lord of life and death – exists; I hope that none among you is impious or a blasphemer – he who believes in the resurrection and the judgement does not disrespect the judge; I hope that all of you go to church. Be honorable and hard-working, labour all week. Then, when daybreak comes on Sunday and the bells ring out, fly to the church. Are any of you absent? There are 168 hours in a week; God asks but one! That is how long the Divine Liturgy lasts from “Blessed is the Kingdom…” until, “Through the prayers of our Holy Fathers…”. Come to church, then, say a “Glory to thee, O God”, say a thank-you for the good things he has given you. Finally, I hope that you all long for the Jerusalem-on-High. You love your earthly homeland, boasting that we built the Parthenon and the Hagia Sofia while other peoples were still living in caves and eating acorns. But if we love our earthly homeland this much, how much more ought we to love our heavenly and eternal homeland?

With this hope, then, as a bishop, I bless you. I bless your homes, your families, your work, and I pray that, through the prayers of the Theotokos, God will be with you now and always. Amen.

[1]               From the book Εμπνευσμένα Κηρύγματα Ορθοδόξου Ομολογίας και Αγιοπατερικής Πνοής (Orthodoxos Kypseli: Thessaloniki, 2011), 413-417. Translated by Fr John Palmer.

[2]               See 2 Timothy 4:4, “And they shall turn away their ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables.”

[3]               See Matthew 16:26, “For what is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?” and Mark 8:37, “Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?”

[4]               One who has a licence to preach in a particular diocese.

[5]               See 1 Corinthians 15:36-38, “Thou fool, that which thou sowest is not quickened, except it die. And that which thou sowest, thou sowest not that body that shall be, but bare grain, it may chance of wheat, or of some other grain: But God giveth it a body as it hath pleased him, and to every seed his own body.

[6]               See Ezekiel 37:1-10.

[7]               Luke 7:13.

[8]               See John 11:39.

[9]               Nekrotafia is a composite word combining the words nekros – dead – and taphos – grave roughly translated as ‘cemetery’. Here Metropolitan Augustinos is telling us to prefer to word koimitirio which also means ‘cemetery’ is rooted in the Greek work koimaw meaning ‘to sleep’.

[10]             Matthew 25:46.

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The Scent of Holiness: Lessons from a Women’s Monastery is now available in Romanian translation, published by Sophia Press. You can order your copy here.

sophia-Mireasma-sfinteniei.-Povestiri-dintr-o-manastire-de-maici---Constantina-PalmerMireasma sfinteniei. Povestiri dintr-o manastire de maici

Povestirile Constantinei Palmer nu sunt nici teologice, nici catehetice. Ele sunt relatări personale, nemijlocite, ale propriilor sale experiențe duhovnicești trăite într‑o mănăstire ortodoxă, prin intermediul cărora autoarea împărtășește cititorilor nu numai trăirile ei de taină într‑un univers existențial plin de iubire și dăruire, ci și invitația de a explora în profunzime acest mod de viață. O astfel de invitație ne deschide paginile cărții de față, îndemnându‑ne să pătrundem într‑o lume mai puțin cunoscută, pentru a afla cât mai multe aspecte interesante, inedite, ziditoare de suflet culese din viața de zi cu zi într‑o mănăstire de maici.

S‑au scris multe cărți și biografii ale părinților stareți contemporani, diferite relatări ale unor experiențe du­hov­ni­cești dobândite în mănăstiri de călugări, dar caracterul unic al viețuirii monahale în mănăstirile de maici a rămas deseori ascuns, departe de ochii pelerinilor. Desigur, în Hristos Domnul nu mai este parte bărbătească și parte femeiască (Galateni 3, 28), însă călugăria femeilor are totuși o calitate distinctă. „Bărbații, după cum spunea o maică stareță, încearcă să taie sfoara cu toporul dintr‑o singură lovitură; femeile se nevoiesc să o desfacă încet. Altfel spus, bărbații încearcă să‑și reteze patimile năpustindu‑se cu forță asupra lor, în timp ce femeile se străduiesc fără încetare să se lupte cu patimile, dar duc această luptă treptat‑treptat, fără a atrage atenția asupra lor.”



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The Unrepentant Woman

(Source) There once lived a woman of prayer and fasting. Externally she appeared pious, but [internally] she had great pride and thought herself a saint. She also had remembrance of wrongs; if she argued with someone not only would she not want forgive the other woman, she never even wanted to see her again. At some point she became sick and she called for a spiritual father to come. But she did not confess thoroughly – this is something some nominal Christians have the habit of doing, they hide their big sins and only reveal the small ones. In the end when the priest came with Holy Communion for her to commune, she turned her face toward the wall and wasn’t able to even look at the divine communion. At the same time, with divine concession, she confessed in a loud voice: “Just as I from pride did not forgive those who trespassed against me, and abhorred [and turned away from] them, so now the Lord turns His face from me and refuses to enter my unworthy soul. I will not see Him in the Heavenly Kingdom, but I will burn in the eternal fire.” And with this her soul departed.


May God enlighten us all to forgive and love one another just as the Lord forgives and has compassion on us!

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orthodoxpathAs quite a few readers of Lessons from a Monastery are from various countries and know various languages, I wanted to introduce you to a new website called The Orthodox Path, a multilingual Orthodox website. It is a great resource and has made spiritual articles available in many languages, including Greek, English, German, Albanian, Romanian, Turkish, as well as others. Below is just one of the website’s many jewels. It is a translation of a talk given by the renowned Elder Symeon of Panorama. Enjoy!

People today are complicated, multi-faceted, confused, and in one way or another, their souls are layered: layer upon layer of blindness, layer upon layer of callousness, layer upon layer of pride. For this reason they are never healed once and for all. As soon as you take a humble attitude, though, Grace intervenes and works a miracle: you are freed. But the work does not end here. This Grace, this light, this healing that comes proceeds also to the next layer further down. And here the sin is more unyielding, is more strongly rooted, the resistance is uncompromising. If you say, “May it be blessed, My God. I will look even deeper and I will acknowledge my stubbornness and my sin, and will humble myself”, then another miracle takes place. And in some incomprehensible way, the second and the third, the fourth and the fifth layers of the soul are put right. But some people will not accept this. They remain at the superficial layers, and spend their life like this and are never healed.” 

Transcribed talks by Arch. Symeon Kragiopoulos (trans. by Fr. Matthew Penney)

Through the prayers of the Holy Fathers, may we have the courage to continually look deep within ourselves and receive the grace of healing!

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One of [Elder Epiphanios’] spiritual children held a high-ranking administrative position, and when he confessed he would often confess the same sin involving his subordinates over and again.  One time during confession the Elder threatened him, saying that if he fell into the same sin again he would receive a very particular penance.  “If you fall into this sin again,” the Elder informed the man, “I will make you sit down and allow me to wash your feet.”  Unfortunately the spiritual child did fall into the same sin again and Elder Epiphanios made good on his threat.  Naturally, this event proved quite a spiritual trial for the spiritual child.  After the washing, the Elder said:  “Since I know that this makes you uneasy, I will wash your feet every time you fall into that particular sin.”  The man never fell into the sin again, though every time his subordinates pushed him to the brink he would shout:  “You owe a great deal to the man who washed my feet!”  They never knew what he was talking about. Translated by Rev Dr John Palmer

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My_Elder_Joseph_lgI’ve had this post planned for a month or so. I had even translated a story from the Greek edition of My Elder (O Gerondas Mou) and planned to link to the new, amazing English edition (pictured above). But then I received my Christmas present from my brother and sister-in-law: the English translation! So, instead of a shotty translation by yours truly, below is an excerpt from the newly-released, most complete biography of Elder Joseph (not only in the English language, but world-wide!). This edition includes even more stories and anecdotes than the original Greek, thanks to the efforts of the fathers of St. Anthony’s Monastery, shedding light on the person, life and works of this great saint of our times, Elder Joseph the Hesychast!

Now that it is finally available in English I highly recommend you read it immediately! (I was at the end of a 500 page book, and 150 pages into another book, but everything gets put on hold for My Elder!)

Every Orthodox Christian should own this book! Buy your copy here.

That evening as light was falling, he had become completely exhausted from the pain and fasting, and his tears dried up. In this state, feebly gazing at the chapel of the Transfiguration at the summit of Mount Athos, he beseeched the Lord: “O Lord, as Thou wast transfigured to Thy disciples, transfigure Thyself also to my soul! Stop the passions and bring peace to my heart! Grant prayer to him who prayeth and restrain my unrestrained nous!”

As he was praying like that with great pain, a subtle breeze full of fragrance came from the chapel. His soul was filled with joy, illumination, and divine love; and from within his heart the prayer began to flow with so much bliss that he thought to himself: “This is Paradise! I don’t need any other Paradise.”

He saw that the prayer was being said within him with mathematical precision like a clock. He was amazed that the prayer continued on its own without any effort on his part.

As soon as he saw this, he was astounded and said: “What’s happening to me now? How is the prayer being said within me? I tried so hard for so long, and I never felt what I feel now.”

When he saw that the prayer was continuing and that he felt so much bliss and happiness, he joyfully said to himself: “So, is this the noetic prayer that I read about in the books of the Philokalia? Is this how it tastes? Is this the light?

He then got up, invigorated by this miracle of noetic prayer, went inside the cave and began saying the prayer synchronized with his breathing, just as the holy Fathers teach. As soon as he had said the prayer a few times, his nous was immediately caught up into theoria. It was to be the first of many times his nous was raptured by God’s grace. He would later wrote about this event in the third as if it had happened to someone else (My Elder Joseph the Hesychast, p. 59).


Photo from here: http://www.diakonima.gr

Have you bought your copy yet? No? Well, what are you waiting for?

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Below is a translation I have done – through Gerontissa Macrina’s prayers – concerning the great rewards God has prepared for those who practice patience when confronted with great trials and temptations, and the spiritual exhalation the soul experiences (in this life or in the next) when we abstain from passing judgement, even on those who openly hate and harm us.

The passage is from Λόγια Καρδίας (pp. 246-250), a collection of homilies by Abbess Macrina of the Holy Monastery of Panagia Odigitria in Volos, Greece. At this time the book is only available in the Greek language; I hope it will be available in multiple languages in the near future. I read it and my soul soars, such is the power of this holy abbess’ divinely-inspired words. She is a saint like the saints of old: wise in spiritual matters, reverent in every regard and virtuous beyond compare! Words cannot express the effect she has on me, a stranger. And yet reading her words makes me feel as though I am sitting at her feet, learning from her firsthand the art of Christian spiritual struggle. Although I am an unworthy, self-proclaimed “disciple” of this holy abbess I laboured to share with you one of the most spiritually potent passages I have yet come across in her book.

May we have her prayers and her blessing!

tree2 Let’s be watchful concerning the matter of passing judgment. Let’s be very watchful concerning passing judgement! It is indescribable how fearful this matter is! “Judge not, that ye be not judged.” Do we safeguard this saying? Even if we don’t have virtues, Christ will save us, He will take us into Paradise if we abstain from judging.

I will tell you something else, again from experience. Once a sister* in the world wanted to say something about me that didn’t happen to me; it was slander. For the glory of Christ I tell you this. Was it a temptation that put her up to it? Was it from hatred? Was it from jealousy that she did it? In any case, I said many, many prayers for her, I mean many prayers. I cried neither for my father, nor for my mother as much as I cried for this sister. With much pain I cried and I said: “My God, save me, help me, give me strength.” The prophet David said: “Deliver me from the slander of men and I will keep thy commandments” (Ps. 119: 134). I felt a great deal of pain inside.

sm treeI saw her coming to me in a vision. Her face had two indentations on account of her tears. It was so real! In the indentations she had clots of perspiration. Her whole face was covered in perspiration and black from suffering and fatigue. She had a sack on her back, too heavy to be lifted. And as soon as I saw her, I wanted to go and help her, to lift the weight from below, but it was like a stone wall and the weight lay there immovable. I said to her: “You are tired!”

“Yes, I am tired of lifting this weight!” she said. It was a stone like the porters used to carry on their backs a long time ago.

She said to me, “This evening is the Queen’s reception and she wants you to go.”

“The Queen wants me?” I asked.

Gerontissa Theophano and Gerontissa Macina

And suddenly a vehicle arrived, not like any carriage or car, it was very different, and Gerontissa Theophano was sitting inside. She looked like a young child, like a young lady of fifteen years. She said: “Come, the Queen will have us at the reception this evening.”

I made the sign of the cross and I got into the vehicle. We proceeded to a beautiful turnpike. I saw a church in front of us – it was like looking at the church of Panagia in Tinos – such a nice church; it was bright, resplendent! I made the sign of the cross as I passed by. Across the way, toward the east, was what seemed to be a palace. The door to the palace was huge, just as doors are in large buildings. There in the middle of the doorway was the Queen, who, from her neck up I couldn’t see on account of the light of her face, because she was shining so brightly. I saw her resplendent sandals; she wore a feloni** and vest, each had two inches of piping embroidered around them.

Two lines were configured in front of her: one line with children who were wearing lace and ribbon in their hair, dressed just as the angels are, while the other line seemed to be composed of widows***, as though they were nuns, wearing monastic clothing, just like we wear.

I started toward the nuns and they told me it wasn’t my turn yet, I would go when it was my turn. Suddenly I heard chanting, “This is the day of the Resurrection, let us be radiant…” And the Queen began to say, “Come martyrs to the platform, come great-martyrs!” They were taking her blessing and going to the platform. From within the palace was heard, “This is the day of the Resurrection…”

weedWhen I approached, I took the hand of the Queen: her slender hand, those nails, that gentle hand has been imprinted on my soul. Padding me on the back she said, “Patience, patience, patience.” Then she addressed one of her maids of honour: “Escort Maria**** to the royal garden.”

I paused for a moment to see where they were chanting “This is the day of the Resurrection”. And I saw that inside the palace a banquet was laid out with very beautiful white tablecloths. What could you desire that the banquet didn’t have!

I lingered to listen and the maid took me by the hand and said, “That is for the martyrs, those who endured great temptations” and she gave me to understand that patience is needed. Afterward she took me to the royal garden, and I saw a vast place which had something like lilies, the brown lily had a cross. Just as the wind blew, so the lilies swayed. A vast place: green, beautiful, enchanted! Within this beautiful exhalation which I found myself, the sorrow in my soul fled, and pleasantness and joy came!

In the morning I went and found this sister who had slandered me, and hugged and kissed her. I didn’t know what to do for her; I didn’t know how to thank her for the false words she had said, I really didn’t know.

This treeexperience stayed in my soul and from that time I have kept the commandment of God: judge not, so as not to be judged – even if I see the act committed in front of me, whatever I happen to see in front of me.

That which I saw in the vision stirred me and left me such comfort. I forgot everything. A purity entered into my nous, a passionlessness, a peacefulness, a heavenly thing entered my soul and I didn’t know how to thank that sister who was the cause of such good.

And I say what a good thing it is for someone to be patient! For this reason the Queen said, “Come martyrs of Christ, come great-martyrs of Christ, enter into the platform…” How can I have the boldness to touch such a banquet? It was the banquet for the martyrs who had struggled, who had endured martyrdom and for whom God had prepared greatness!

*Although Gerontissa calls this woman “sister” it seems that she was a laywoman.

**A feloni (φελόνι) is a chasuble, which in its origin was a traveling garment in the late Roman Empire. It is like a poncho, a circular garment with a hole in the middle for the head.    

***It is a tradition in Greece for widows to wear black headscarfs and dress.

****Gerontissa Macrina’s name before monastic tonsure was Maria.

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